Cultural Ontologies: the ArCo Knowledge Graph.

Cultural Ontologies: the ArCo Knowledge Graph.

Introduction: Standing for ‘Architecture of Knowledge’, ArCo is an open set of resources developed and managed by some Italian institutions, like the MiBAC (Minister for the Italian Cultural Heritage) and, within it, the ICCD – Institute of the General Catalogue and Documentation), and the CNR – Italian National Research Council. Through the application of eXtreme Design (XD), ArCO basically consists in an ontology network comprising seven modules (the arco, the core, the catalogue, the location, the denotative description, the context description, and the cultural event) and a set of LOD data comprising a huge amount of linked entities referring to the national Italian cultural resources, properties and events. Under constant refinement, ArCo represents an example of a “robust Semantic Web resource” (Carriero et al., 11) in the field of cultural heritage, along with other projects like, just to mention a couple of them, the Google Arts&Culture (https://artsandculture.google.com/) or the Smithsonian American Art Museum (https://americanart.si.edu/about/lod).

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Programmable Corpora: Introducing DraCor, an Infrastructure for the Research on European Drama

Programmable Corpora: Introducing DraCor, an Infrastructure for the Research on European Drama

Introduction: The DraCor ecosystem encourages various approaches to the browsing and consultation of the data collected in the corpora, like those detailed in the Tools section: the Shiny DraCor app (https://shiny.dracor.org/), along with the SPARQL queries and the Easy Linavis interfaces (https://dracor.org/sparql and https://ezlinavis.dracor.org/ respectively). The project, thus, aims at creating a suitable digital environment for the development of an innovative way to approach literary corpora, potentially open to collaborations and interactions with other initiatives thanks to its ontology and Linked Open data-based nature.
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Worthäufigkeiten als Quelle für die Geschichtswissenschaft? – Einblicke in die Digital Humanities

Worthäufigkeiten als Quelle für die Geschichtswissenschaft? – Einblicke in die Digital Humanities

Introduction: Especially humanities scholars (not only historians) who have not yet had any contact with the Digital Humanities, Silke Schwandt offers a motivating and vivid introduction to see the potential of this approach, using the analysis of word frequencies as an example. With the help of Voyant Tools and Nopaque, she provides her listeners with the necessary equipment to work quantitatively with their corpora. Schwandt’s presentation, to which the following report by Maschka Kunz, Isabella Stucky and Anna Ruh refers, can also be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJvbC3b1yPc.

Fragmentarium: a Model for Digital Fragmentology

Fragmentarium: a Model for Digital Fragmentology

Introduction: One of the major challenges of digital data workflows in the Arts and Humanities is that resources that belong together, in extreme cases, like this particular one, even parts of dismembered manuscripts, are hosted and embedded in different geographical and institutional silos. Combining IIIF with a mySQL database, Fragmentarium provides a user-friendly but also standardized, open workspace for the virtual reconstruction of medieval manuscript fragments. Lisa Fagin Davis’s blog post gives contextualized insights of the potentials of Fragmentarium and how, as she writes, “technology has caught up with our dreams”. 

Offen, vielfältig und kreativ. Ein Bericht zum Barcamp Data Literacy #dhddatcamp20 bei der DHd 2020 | DHd-Blog

Offen, vielfältig und kreativ. Ein Bericht zum Barcamp Data Literacy #dhddatcamp20 bei der DHd 2020 | DHd-Blog

Introduction: What are the essential data literacy skills data literacy skills in (Digital) Humanities? How good data management practices can be translated to humanities disciplines and how to engage more and more humanists in such conversations? Ulrike Wuttke’s reflections on the “Vermittlung von Data Literacy in den Geisteswissenschaften“ barcamp at the DHd 2020 conference does not only make us heartfelt nostalgic about scholarly meetings happening face to face but it also gives in-depth and contextualized insights regarding the questions above. The post comes with rich documentation (including links to the barcamp’s metapad, tweets, photos, follow-up posts) and is also serve as a guide for organizers of barcamps in the future.

GROBID: when data extraction becomes a suite

GROBID: when data extraction becomes a suite

Introduction: GROBID is an already well-known open source tool in the field of Digital Humanities, originally built to extract and parse bibliographical metadata from scholarly works. The acronym stands for GeneRation Of BIbliographic Data.
Shaped by use cases and adoptions to a range of different DH and non-DH settings, the tool has been progressively evolved into a suite of technical features currently applied to various fields, like that of journals, dictionaries and archives.
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