Mediate: A Collaborative Time-Based Media Annotation Tool for the Web

Mediate: A Collaborative Time-Based Media Annotation Tool for the Web

Mediate is a collaborative time-based media annotation tool for the web that can be used both individually and collaboratively for synchronous and asynchronous digital annotation. One of its highlighting features is accessibility and customization, i.e. the ability to customize the schema that forms the basis of the analysis or the purpose of the project.
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An Engaging Environment for Ancient Chinese Texts: An Introduction to ctext.org

An Engaging Environment for Ancient Chinese Texts: An Introduction to ctext.org

The Chinese Text Project is a well-established resource in Sinology, providing open access to a large number of ancient Chinese texts. As a digital medium, it utilizes crowdsourcing, linked data, knowledge graph and other computational technologies to provide an interactive interface for users who are interested in ancient Chinese texts. Beyond its main aim of providing open access to Chinese literature and philosophy texts, the project features an integrated Chinese character dictionary tool, images of scanned source texts, a search function for parallel passages, and much more. In terms of structured data, the project’s data wiki contains a wealth of records on entities such as persons, locations, and works.
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“Multilingual Research Projects: Non-Latin Script Challenges for Making Use of Standards, Authority Files, and Character Recognition”.

Everyone of us is accustomed to reading academic contributions using the Latin alphabet, for which we have already standard characters and formats. But what about texts written in languages featuring different, ideographic-based alphabets (for example, Chinese and Japanese)? What kind of recognition techniques and metadata are necessary to adopt in order to represent them in a digital context?

“Document Enrichment as a Tool for Automated Interview Coding”

“Document Enrichment as a Tool for Automated Interview Coding”

Following our last post focusing on Critical Discourse Analysis, today we highlight an automated document enrichment pipeline for automated interview coding, proposed by Ajda Pretnar Žagar, Nikola Ðukic´, Rajko Muršic in their paper presented at the Conference on Language Technologies & Digital Humanities, Ljubljana 2022. As described in the “Essential Guide to Coding Qualitative Data” (https://delvetool.com/guide), one of the main field of application of such a procedure is Ethnography, but not only.

Thanks to qualitative data coding it is possible to enrich texts through adding labels and descriptions to specific passages, that are generally pinpointed by means of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis softwares (CAQDAS). This can be valid for several fields of applications, from the humanities to biology, from sociology to medicine.
In their paper, Pretnar Žagar, Ðukic´ and Muršicˇ illustrate how relying on a couple of taxonomies (or onthologies) already known in anthropological studies may represent an asset to automatize and hasten the process of data labelling. These taxonomies are the Outline of Cultural Materials (OCM) and the ETSEO (acronym for Ethnological Topography of Slovenian Ethnic Territory) systematics. In both cases we deal with taxonomies elaborated and applied in ethnographic research in order to organize and better analyze concepts and categories related to human cultures and traditions.

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Tools for Critical Discourse Analysis – and introduction to tool critizism

Tools for Critical Discourse Analysis – and introduction to tool critizism

In this video, Drs. Stephanie Vie and Jennifer deWinter explain some of the tools digital humanists can use for critical discourse analysis and visualization of data collected from social media platforms. Although not all the tools they mention are open source, the majority of them have free to use or freemium versions, including AntConc, a free-to-use concordancing tool, or several Twitter data visualisation tools such as Tweeps map or Tweetstats.

Even though the video does not provide just-as-good open source alternatives to Atlas.ti or MAXQDA (an obviously a recurrent question or shortcoming that is recurrently discussed on OpenMethods), it sets an excellent example for how to introduce tool criticism in the classroom alongside introduction to certain Digital Humanities Tools. After briefly touching upon both advantages and disadvantages of each tool, they encourage their audience (students in Digital Humanities study programs) to pilot each of them by using the same data-set and not only compare their results but also reflect on the epistemic processes in-between.

Sharing the video on Humanities Commons with stable archiving, DOI and rich metadata is among the best things that could happen to teaching resources of all kinds.

What is PixPlot? (DH Tools) – YouTube

What is PixPlot? (DH Tools) – YouTube

Introduction: This short video teaser summarizes the main characteristics of PixPlot, a Python-based tool for clustering images and analyzing them from a numerical perspective as well as its pedagogical relevance as far as
machine learning is concerned.

The paper “Visual Patterns Discovery in Large Databases of Paintings”, presented at the Digital Humanities 2016 Conference held in Poland,
can be considered the foundational text for the development of the PixPlot Project at Yale University.
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LoGaRT and RISE: Two multilingual tools from the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

LoGaRT and RISE: Two multilingual tools from the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Introduction: This post introduces two tools developed by the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, LoGaRT and RISE with a focus on Asia and Eurasia. […]The concept of LoGaRT – treating local gazetteers as “databases” by themselves – is an innovative and pertinent way to articulate the essence of the platform: providing opportunities for multi-level analysis from the close reading of the sources (using, for example, the carousel mode) to the large-scale, “bird’s eye view” of the materials across geographical and temporal boundaries. Local gazetteers are predominantly textual sources – this characteristic of the collection is reflected in the capabilities of LoGaRT as well, since some of its key capabilities include data search (using Chinese characters), collection and analysis, as well as tagging and dataset comparison. That said, LoGaRT also offers integrated visualization tools and supports the expansion of the collection and tagging features to the images used in a number of gazetteers. The opportunity to smoothly intertwine these visual and textual collections with Chinese historical maps (see CHMap) is an added, and much welcome, advantage of the tool, which helps to develop sophisticated and multifaceted analyses.
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Annotation Guidelines For narrative levels, time features, and subjective narration styles in fiction (SANTA 2).

Annotation Guidelines For narrative levels, time features, and subjective narration styles in fiction (SANTA 2).

Introduction: If you are looking for solutions to translate narratological concepts to annotation guidelines to tag or mark-up your texts for both qualitative and quantitative analysis, then Edward Kearns’s paper “Annotation Guidelines for narrative levels, time features, and subjective narration styles in fiction” is for you! The tag set is designed to be used in XML, but they can be flexibly adopted to other working environments too, including for instance CATMA. The use of the tags is illustrated on a corpus of modernist fiction.
The guidelines have been published in a special issue of The Journal of Cultural Analytics (vol. 6, issue 4) entirely devoted to the illustration of the Systematic Analysis of Narrative levels Through Annotation (SANTA) project, serving as the broader intellectual context to the guidelines. All articles in the special issue are open peer reviewed , open access, and are available in both PDF and XML formats.
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