Fragmentarium: a Model for Digital Fragmentology

Fragmentarium: a Model for Digital Fragmentology

Introduction: One of the major challenges of digital data workflows in the Arts and Humanities is that resources that belong together, in extreme cases, like this particular one, even parts of dismembered manuscripts, are hosted and embedded in different geographical and institutional silos. Combining IIIF with a mySQL database, Fragmentarium provides a user-friendly but also standardized, open workspace for the virtual reconstruction of medieval manuscript fragments. Lisa Fagin Davis’s blog post gives contextualized insights of the potentials of Fragmentarium and how, as she writes, “technology has caught up with our dreams”. 

Offen, vielfältig und kreativ. Ein Bericht zum Barcamp Data Literacy #dhddatcamp20 bei der DHd 2020 | DHd-Blog

Offen, vielfältig und kreativ. Ein Bericht zum Barcamp Data Literacy #dhddatcamp20 bei der DHd 2020 | DHd-Blog

Introduction: What are the essential data literacy skills data literacy skills in (Digital) Humanities? How good data management practices can be translated to humanities disciplines and how to engage more and more humanists in such conversations? Ulrike Wuttke’s reflections on the “Vermittlung von Data Literacy in den Geisteswissenschaften“ barcamp at the DHd 2020 conference does not only make us heartfelt nostalgic about scholarly meetings happening face to face but it also gives in-depth and contextualized insights regarding the questions above. The post comes with rich documentation (including links to the barcamp’s metapad, tweets, photos, follow-up posts) and is also serve as a guide for organizers of barcamps in the future.

Document ALL the things!| The Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton

Document ALL the things!| The Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton

Introduction: Sustainability questions such as how to maintain digital project outputs after the funding period, or how to keep aging code and infrastructure that are important for our research up-to-date are among the major challenges DH projects are facing today. This post gives us a sneak peek into the solutions and working practices from the Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton. In their approach to build capacity for sustaining DH projects and preserve access to data and software, they view projects as collaborative and process-based scholarship. Therefore, their focus is on implementing project management workflows and documentation tools that can be flexibly applied to projects of different scopes and sizes and also allow for further refinement in due case. By sharing these resources together with their real-life use cases in DH projects, their aim is to benefit other scholarly communities and sustain a broader conversation about these tricky issues.

Transkribus & Magazines: Transkribus’ Transcription & Recognition Platform (TRP) as Social Machine…

Transkribus & Magazines: Transkribus’ Transcription & Recognition Platform (TRP) as Social Machine…

Introduction: This article proposes establishing a good collaboration between FactMiners and the Transkribus project that will help the Transkribus team to evolve the “sustainable virtuous” ecosystem they described as a Transcription & Recognition Platform — a Social Machine for Job Creation & Skill Development in the 21st Century!

Creating Web APIs with Python and Flask | Programming Historian

Creating Web APIs with Python and Flask | Programming Historian

Introduction: This very complete tutorial by Patrick Smyth will help digital humanists or any interested person on digital technologies applied to projects how to make data more accessible to users through APIs (Application Programming Interfaces). After explaining the basics about APIs and databases, an API is built and put into practice. Python 3 and the Flask are the web frameworks used for developing this API.

Preliminary Findings: Rent Seeking by Elsevier

Introduction: Open Access has made an impact on the business strategies of major publishing companies, but the effects may turn out to be perverse. Pressed by Open Access to find new revenue models publishing houses have moved to acquire ownership and dominance of academic data infrastructures. This article investigates the strategy of Elsevier to acquire renewed economical gain of academic work.