If These Crawls Could Talk: Studying and Documenting Web Archives Provenance

Introduction: With Web archives becoming an increasingly more important resource for (humanities) researchers, it also becomes paramount to investigate and understand the ways in which such archives are being built and how to make the processes involved transparent. Emily Maemura, Nicholas Worby, Ian Milligan, and Christoph Becker report on the comparison of three use cases and suggest a framework to document Web archive provenance.

Attributing Authorship in the Noisy Digitized Correspondence of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm | Digital Humanities

Introduction: Apart from its buoyant conclusion that authorship attribution methods are rather robust to noise (transcription errors) introduced by optical character recognition and handwritten text recognition, this article also offers a comprehensive read on the application of sophisticated computational techniques for testing and validation in a data curation process. 

XML Pipelines and XProc 3.0: Report of the WG Meeting in Aachen – CCeH

Introduction: Processing XML flows has sometimes been a complicated affair traditionally, and XProc was designed to standardise and simplify the process by using declarative XML pipelines to manage operations. This blog post by Gioele Barabucci presents conclusions from a meeting in late 2017 of the XProc 3.0 working group, exploring the latest emerging version of the standard and the kinds of challenges it will overcome.