The Uncanny Valley and the Ghost in the Machine

The Uncanny Valley and the Ghost in the Machine

Introduction: There is a postulated level of anthropomorphism where people feel uncanny about the appearance of a robot. But what happens if digital facsimiles and online editions become nigh indistinguishable from the real, yet materially remaining so vastly different? How do we ethically provide access to the digital object without creating a blindspot and neglect for the real thing. A question that keeps digital librarian Dot Porter awake and which she ponders in this thoughtful contribution.

From Hermeneutics to Data to Networks: Data Extraction and Network Visualization of Historical Sources

From Hermeneutics to Data to Networks: Data Extraction and Network Visualization of Historical Sources

Introduction: This lesson by Marten Düring from the “Programming Historian-Website” gently introduces novices to the topic to Network Visualisation of Historical Sources. As a case study it covers not only the general advantages of network visualisation for humanists but also a step-by-step explanation of the process from extraction of the data until the visualization (using the Palladio-tool). This lesson has also been translated into Spanish and includes many useful references for further reading.

Old Periodicals, a New Datatype and Spiderfied Query Results in Wikidata

Old Periodicals, a New Datatype and Spiderfied Query Results in Wikidata

Introduction: This blog post describes how the National Library of Wales makes us of Wikidata for enriching their collections. It especially showcases new features for visualizing items on a map, including a clustering service, the support of polygons and multipolygons. It also shows how polygons like the shapes of buildings can be imported from OpenStreetMap into Wikidata, which is a great example for re-using already existing information.

KNOW YOUR IMPLEMENTATION: SUBGRAPHS IN LITERARY NETWORKS

Introduction: Know Your Implementation: Subgraphs in Literary Networks shows how the online tool ezlinavis can give account of detached subgraphs while working with network analysis of literary texts. For this specific case, Goethe’s Faust, Part One (1808) was analyzed and visualized with ezlinavis, and average distances were calculated giving some new results to this research in relation to Faust as protagonist.