Novels in distant reading: the European Literary Text Collection (ELTeC).

Novels in distant reading: the European Literary Text Collection (ELTeC).

Introduction: Among the most recent, currently ongoing, projects exploiting distant techniques reading there is the European Literary Text Collection (ELTeC), which is one of the main elements of the Distant Reading for European Literary History (COST Action CA16204, https://www.distant-reading.net/). Thanks to the contribution provided by four Working Groups (respectively dealing with Scholarly Resources, Methods and Tools, Literary Theory and History, and Dissemination: https://www.distant-reading.net/working-groups/ ), the project aims at providing at least 2,500 novels written in ten European languages with a range of Distant Reading computational tools and methodological strategies to approach them from various perspectives (textual, stylistic, topical, et similia). A full description of the objectives of the Action and of ELTeC can be found and read in the Memorandum of Understanding for the implementation of the COST Action “Distant Reading for European Literary History” (DISTANT-READING) CA 16204”, available at the link  https://e-services.cost.eu/files/domain_files/CA/Action_CA16204/mou/CA16204-e.pdf

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The Language Interpretability Tool: Extensible, Interactive Visualizations and Analysis for NLP Models

The Language Interpretability Tool: Extensible, Interactive Visualizations and Analysis for NLP Models

Introduction: NLP modelling and tasks performed by them are becoming an integral part of our daily realities (everyday or research). A central concern of NLP research is that for many of their users, these models still largely operate as black boxes with limited reflections on why the model makes certain predictions, how their usage is skewed towards certain content types, what are the underlying social, cultural biases etc. The open source Language Interoperability Tool aim to change this for the better and brings transparency to the visualization and understanding of NLP models. The pre-print describing the tool comes with rich documentation and description of the tool (including case studies of different kinds) and gives us an honest SWOT analysis of it.

Programmable Corpora: Introducing DraCor, an Infrastructure for the Research on European Drama

Programmable Corpora: Introducing DraCor, an Infrastructure for the Research on European Drama

Introduction: The DraCor ecosystem encourages various approaches to the browsing and consultation of the data collected in the corpora, like those detailed in the Tools section: the Shiny DraCor app (https://shiny.dracor.org/), along with the SPARQL queries and the Easy Linavis interfaces (https://dracor.org/sparql and https://ezlinavis.dracor.org/ respectively). The project, thus, aims at creating a suitable digital environment for the development of an innovative way to approach literary corpora, potentially open to collaborations and interactions with other initiatives thanks to its ontology and Linked Open data-based nature.
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Worthäufigkeiten als Quelle für die Geschichtswissenschaft? – Einblicke in die Digital Humanities

Worthäufigkeiten als Quelle für die Geschichtswissenschaft? – Einblicke in die Digital Humanities

Introduction: Especially humanities scholars (not only historians) who have not yet had any contact with the Digital Humanities, Silke Schwandt offers a motivating and vivid introduction to see the potential of this approach, using the analysis of word frequencies as an example. With the help of Voyant Tools and Nopaque, she provides her listeners with the necessary equipment to work quantitatively with their corpora. Schwandt’s presentation, to which the following report by Maschka Kunz, Isabella Stucky and Anna Ruh refers, can also be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJvbC3b1yPc.

Zur Digitalisierung der Materialität mittelalterlicher Objekte. Ein Bericht aus der wissenschaftsgeschichtlichen Werkstatt

Zur Digitalisierung der Materialität mittelalterlicher Objekte. Ein Bericht aus der wissenschaftsgeschichtlichen Werkstatt

Introduction: In this blog post, Michael Schonhardt explores and evaluates a range of freely available, Open Source tools – Inkscape, Blender, Stellarium, Sketchup – that enable the digital, 3D modelling of medieval scholarly objects. These diverse tools bring easily implementable solutions for both the analysis and the communication of results of object-related cultural studies and are especially suitable for projects with small budgets.

RAWGraphs: A Visualization Platform to Create Open Outputs

RAWGraphs: A Visualization Platform to Create Open Outputs

The paper illustrates the features of the innovative tool in the field of data visualization: it is the framework RAW Graphs, available in an open access format at the website https://rawgraphs.io/. The framework permits to establish a connection between data coming from various applications (from Microsoft Excel to Google Spreadsheets) and their visualization in several layouts.

As detailed in the video guide available in the ‘Learning section’ (https://rawgraphs.io/learning), it is possible to load own data through a simple ‘copy and past’ command, and then select a chart-based layout among those provided: contour plot, beeswarm plot, hexagonal binnings, scatterplot, treemap, bump chart, Gantt chart, multiple pie charts, alluvial diagram and barchart. The platform permits also to unstack data according to a wide and a narrow format.

RAWGraphs, ideal for those working in the field of design but not only, is kept as an open-source resource thanks to an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign (https://rawgraphs.io/blog).
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Narrelations — Visualizing Narrative Levels and their Correlations with Temporal Phenomena

Narrelations — Visualizing Narrative Levels and their Correlations with Temporal Phenomena

Introduction: Introduction by OpenMethods Editor (Christopher Nunn): Information visualizations are helpful in detecting patterns in large amounts of text and are often used to illustrate complex relationships. Not only can they show descriptive phenomena that could be revealed in other ways, albeit slower and more laborious, but they can also heuristically generate new knowledge. The authors of this article did just that. The focus here is, fortunately, on narratological approaches that have so far hardly been combined with digital text analyzes, but which are ideally suited for them. To eight German novellas a variety of interactive visualizations were created, all of which show: The combination of digital methods with narratological interest can provide great returns to Literary Studies work. After reading this article, it pays to think ahead in this field.