RAWGraphs: A Visualization Platform to Create Open Outputs

RAWGraphs: A Visualization Platform to Create Open Outputs

The paper illustrates the features of the innovative tool in the field of data visualization: it is the framework RAW Graphs, available in an open access format at the website https://rawgraphs.io/. The framework permits to establish a connection between data coming from various applications (from Microsoft Excel to Google Spreadsheets) and their visualization in several layouts.

As detailed in the video guide available in the ‘Learning section’ (https://rawgraphs.io/learning), it is possible to load own data through a simple ‘copy and past’ command, and then select a chart-based layout among those provided: contour plot, beeswarm plot, hexagonal binnings, scatterplot, treemap, bump chart, Gantt chart, multiple pie charts, alluvial diagram and barchart. The platform permits also to unstack data according to a wide and a narrow format.

RAWGraphs, ideal for those working in the field of design but not only, is kept as an open-source resource thanks to an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign (https://rawgraphs.io/blog).
[click ‘Read’ for more]

Mining ethnicity: Discourse-driven topic modelling of immigrant discourses in the USA, 1898–1920

Mining ethnicity: Discourse-driven topic modelling of immigrant discourses in the USA, 1898–1920

Introduction: The article illustrates the application of a ‘discourse-driven topic modeling’ (DDTM) to the analysis of the corpus ChronicItaly comprising several newspapers in Italian language, appeared in the USA during the time of massive migration towards America between the end of the XIX century and the first two decades of the XX (1898-1920).

The method combines both Text Modelling (™) and the discourse-historical approach (DHA) in order to get a more comprehensive representation of the ethnocultural and linguistic identity of the Italian group of migrants in the historical American context in crucial periods of time like that immediately preceding the eruption and that of the unfolding of World War I.

A World of Possibilities: a corpus-based approach to the diachrony of modality in Latin

A World of Possibilities: a corpus-based approach to the diachrony of modality in Latin

Introduction: Hosted at the University of Lausanne, “A world of possibilities. Modal pathways over an extra-long period of time: the diachrony in the Latin language” (WoPoss) is a project under development exploiting a corpus-based approach to the study and reconstruction of the diachrony of modality in Latin.
Following specific annotation guidelines applied to a set of various texts pertaining to the time span between 3rd century BCE and 7th century CE, the work team lead by Francesca Dell’Oro aims at analyzing the patterns of modality in the Latin language through a close consideration of lexical markers.

Pipelines for languages: not only Latin! The Italian NLP Tool (Tint)

Pipelines for languages: not only Latin! The Italian NLP Tool (Tint)

The StandforCore NLP wishes to represent a complete Java-based set of tools for various aspects of language analysis, from annotation to dependency parsing, from lemmatization
to coreference resolution. It thus provides a range of tools which
can be potentially applied to other languages apart from English.

Among the languages to which the StandfordCore NLP is mainly applied there is Italian, for which the Tint pipeline has been developed as described in the paper “Italy goes to Stanford: a collection of CoreNLP modules for Italian” by Alessio Palmero Apostolo and Giovanni Moretti.

On the Tint webpage the whole pipeline can be found and downloaded: it comprises tokenization and sentence splitting, morphological analysis and lemmatization, part-of-speech tagging, named-entity recognition and dependency parsing, including wrappers under construction. [Click ‘Read more’ for the whole post.]

The Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK): at the forefront of Digital Philology for historical languages

The Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK): at the forefront of Digital Philology for historical languages

Introduction: Natural Language Processing techniques applied to historical languages have been attracting an increasing interest in the academic community. Many online resources, like annotated corpora, are already available, as well as various methodologies and tools. However, for digital philologist dealing with these languages it appears important to rely on a specific pipeline, on a sequence of working steps and applications thanks to which accomplishing an effective text analysis.
This need is addressed by the Classical Language Toolkit, as illustrated by Patrick J. Burns in his contribution “Building a Text Analysis Pipeline for Classical Languages”.

Approaching Linked Data

Approaching Linked Data

Introduction: Linked Data and Linked Open Data are gaining an increasing interest and application in many fields. A recent experiment conducted in 2018 at Furman University illustrates and discusses some of the challenges from a pedagogical perspective posed by Linked Open Data applied to research in the historical domain.

“Linked Open Data to navigate the Past: using Peripleo in class” by Chiara Palladino describes the exploitation of the search-engine Peripleo in order to reconstruct the past of four archeologically-relevant cities. Many databases, comprising various types of information, have been consulted, and the results, as highlighted in the contribution by Palladino, show both advantages and limitations of a Linked Open Data-oriented approach to historical investigations.

‘Voyant Tools’

‘Voyant Tools’

Introduction: Digital humanists looking for tools in order to visualize and analyze texts can rely on ‘Voyant Tools’ (https://voyant-tools.org), a software package created by S.Sinclair and G.Rockwell. Online resources are available in order to learn how to use Voyant. In this post, we highlight two of them: “Using Voyant-Tools to Formulate Research Questions for Textual Data” by Filipa Calado (GC Digital Fellows and the tutorial “Investigating texts with Voyant” by Miriam Posner.